Category Archives: Maritime Archaeology

Blog Tour – Doomed Destroyer by Ron Cope

Today is my stop of the blog tour for Doomed Destroyer by author Ron Cope. Here’s the blurb ;-

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Genre – Military / Maritime Archaeology
Length – 560
Publication – 10 April 2018

Synopsis

On March 1st 1940, Adolf Hitler ordered Operation Weserubung: the invasion of Norway. Having swept across Europe, the Nazi assault on Scandinavia was designed to secure the valuable iron ore being delivered by rail from Sweden to the Norwegian port of Narvik. To complete the task, Hitler sent ten large destroyers, with 220 Alpine Troops on each. Five smaller British H Class destroyers were sent up the fjord in retaliation, with little knowledge of what to expect. On April 10th , the first British battle of Narvik began in earnest. Royal Naval Captain Bernard Warburton-Lee led his flotilla at midnight into the fjord; undetected, under darkness and in driving snow storms. The harbour erupted into a torpedo attack; back into the fjord, the destroyers Hardy, Hunter, Hotspur, Havock and Hostilewere confronted by five German destroyers. A ferocious sea battle ensued and Hardy and Hunter were lost.

In his first account of The Battle of Narvick, Attack at Dawn, Ron Cope focussed on the experience and the survival of the crew of HMS Hardy. After nine long years of research, he now reveals for the first time the untold story of HMS Hunter and her crew. Just forty-eight of the 159 servicemen on board survived in the cold waters of the fjord; picked up by German destroyers, they were eventually forced to march in freezing conditions over the mountains into internment in Sweden. Before the handover to the Swedish authorities, a German Army officer made the British servicemen sign a form: “On my being sent into Sweden I will not take up arms against Germany… Should I do so, and in the event of again being taken prisoner I shall be subject to such conditions as are provided under the Death Penalty Act”.

Doomed Destroyer follows the astounding stories of the Hunter sailors, who would spend the next five years plotting and attempting to escape their captivity. Cope provides an extensive account of the viciously fought events at sea and in the fjords, examining the Norwegian price paid at Narvik and the early impact of war on the local community’s simple way of life. A remarkable account delivered with care and respect for those lost and left behind, Doomed Destroyer shines a light on this important but previously little known event in British history.

“Without dedicated men like Ron Cope, the testimony and the stories of the men who were there – whether they were lost, wounded, or survived – what became of them, their families, might otherwise be lost to future generations.” Percy C. Danby, Lieutenant (E), C.D. RCN Retired. Ottawa. March 2017, survivor on HMS Hotspur.

Review

Doomed destroyer is a meaty read to say the least at 560 pages but it’s packed full first-person accounts that recount events that give a fascinating insight into the lives of the servicemen who signed up to protect their country.

For any fan of maritime history I’m sure they would love the detail in which the author goes..shining a light the not only events that impact a whole crew but also smaller events that might have otherwise been overlooked.

At times I felt a bit overwhelmed with the detail as it’s fired at you at such a pace it can be hard to take it all in but overall the book does exactly what you’d expected and gives the reader real insights into a life many of us could never imagine.

The author clearly researched the book well and that’s evident with the numerous first-hand accounts he draws on which helps the book as you feel it has a real connection with those who stories are being told rather than just a plain old history text-book.

Personally I would have liked the book broke down a bit more to give a layman more manageable chunks of info with  time to stop and reflect but overall at 560 pages it’s a fact filled book that really does help bring these brave individuals to life. History books often take away the human edge of a tale for me and its books like this that ensure that connection isn’t lost in time.

To find out more head to Goodreads or Amazon.

About the author: Born in Salford, Ron Cope followed in his father’s footsteps and joined the Royal Navy in 1964, working in electronics. After leaving the forces in 1986, he spent over twenty years working in the probation service, specifically with young offenders. Now a proud father and  grandfather, Cope is retired and living with his wife Alison in Telford, Shropshire. His first naval history book Attack at Dawn: Reliving the First Battle of Narvik in World War Two was published to acclaim back in 2015.

My thanks go to Authoright and the author for a chance to read/review the book in exchange for my honest review. 

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